Joe’s Blog

Welcome to my blog!

A reminder that these blog entries are not ‘timely.’  They do not address issues that relate to the present news of the world.  They address perennial issues faced by most pianists when striving to excel in their playing.  I encourage you to search through the posts to find the ones that will yield the greatest benefit to you.

You can also use this list of all blog posts in order of keyword, which you can also sort by title.

You are also welcome to contact me to suggest a topic that you would like to see appear on the site, or ask questions or comment below each entry. Enjoy!

PLAYING WITHOUT ANY PAIN OR DISCOMFORT: part six

March 17, 2017

Second Experiment continued:

2E.

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PLAYING WITHOUT ANY PAIN OR DISCOMFORT: part seven

March 17, 2017

Second Experiment continued:

2F.

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PLAYING “EXTREMELY” FAST:

March 16, 2017

Extreme speed is achievable by going beyond what seems to be the fastest speed attainable by systematically or gradually going faster and faster.  Eventually one reaches and impasse.  Simply making the same muscle motions faster no longer produces results.

Our muscles are indeed capable of acting even faster.  Only one has to instigate a speed that treats the normal limit not as an impassable boundary but something that can be jumped right over.  Into another region.  Where the muscles behave in a way that they can only act if one has surpassed the normal limit.  We can only discover this region of speed if we first try to play as fast as possible, at which point we say to ourselves: now go faster.

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THE ABILITY TO “SHAPE” PHRASES.

March 2, 2017

Originally Posted on Facebook on 2.23.16

In a previous post we showed:

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Beginners: AT WHAT EXACT MOMENT SHOULD THE TEACHER CORRECT A STUDENT’S “WRONG” NOTE?

March 1, 2017

Originally posted on Facebook on 2.27.16

The duration in time between when a student makes an error and when the teacher points it out, is not a constant but a variable; a finely tuned variable that is correct for the particular student.

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